marling

DESIGNING. DEVELOPING. WEAVING. CREATING!

Marling & Evans are designers and manufacturers of England’s finest traditional cloths. Created in the same mill for the last 25 years here at Upper Mills in Huddersfield, Marling & Evans’ woollens are world renowned for their quality, and a brand steeped in history.

Marling & Evans offer a wide variety of cloths ranging from classic British twills and flannel to country tweeds. The cloth lends itself to country suits (perfect for the races), jackets and bespoke overcoats.

OUR COLLECTION

Biella UK work with the best tweeds. Collaborating with a brand Donegal Fabrics. There is a real heritage from this brand. In Ireland tweed manufacturing is associated with county Donegal. Tweed has been produced in this area of Ireland for centuries. It is said that the colours of Ireland can be seen in tweed. It is usually of soft, muted shades that reflect the colours of the landscape. Originally dyes for the product were from the countryside.

These came from berries, plants and flowers. These sheep in the hills of Donegal thrived in their surroundings in the countryside. The sheep provided a natural fibre that was spun and woven. Tweed has seen a massive resurgence in popularity and is worn by celebrities and famous people the world over.

INDUSTRIAL FABRICS

When the Industrial Revolution took place the cottage weavers could not compete and took their skills into the Mills. Over the years certain UK countries became  synonymous with fabric and textiles and Huddersfield was one of them.  ‘Made in Huddersfield’ became a massively famous adage that was sort  after worldwide.

The town flourished with its fame and if you look at the  town today the architecture of the old buildings shows the money  invested in this town by the industrialists at that time. There were so  many traditional craftsmen in this area at the time. From spinners,  designers, weavers, menders and so many more types of tradespeople.  Sadly over the years some of the mills have gone but a strong history  and heritage still surrounds tweeds in Huddersfield today.

gh

TWEEDS HUDDERSFIELD IN UK

Huddersfield has always had a massive reputation for producing  exceptional tweeds. A vast heritage that has spanned 700 years. The  history of Huddersfield being at the heart of textile manufacturing is  huge. There are a number of reasons why the area has proven so popular as a hub for not only textile production on the whole but for  specifically tweed. There are unique geological and environmental  factors that made this the perfect area for creating stunning wool  textiles.

The convergence of two rivers, the river Colne and Holme was a unique area of water that filtered slowly through the Pennines. The rivers provided the perfect environment for the sheep to graze and it  was perfect for washing raw wool. It started as a cottage industry with  people spinning and weaving wool cloth in their own homes. They sold  through Merchants at the local cloth hall.

The Marling & Evans Range

OUR GALLERY

CLOTH EXPORT

The original name of the cloth exported from the Hebrides was said to be ‘Tweel’, The story goes that a wrongly written invoice from William Watson of Hawick, Scottish Borders in 1826 to James Locke, a London merchant accidentally created the Tweed name. Famous designer brands are offering tweed in their ranges and this has also led to high street ranges. Traditional wooden mills use methods from over many years to create the tweed.

DIFFERENT DESIGNS

Looking at tweed in the 20th century tweeds have evolved to have different variations to make them lighter in weight and with several varieties of different designs. History has reported that the birth of the name ‘Tweed’ came about as an administration error. James Locke misinterpreted Watson’s invoice, understanding it to be a trade-name taken from the River Tweed that flows through the Scottish Borders. From this moment on the cloth was called Tweed.

SEVEN MILLION OF CLOTH

Have different variations to make them lighter in weight and with several varieties of different designs. In the 1950’s and 1960’s, tweed got a makeover from designers such as Coco Chanel with her Linton Tweed suits. In the 1960’s Harris Tweed production ran to about seven million metres of cloth but had dropped to just 500,000 million in 2009. But things are looking up for the   brand – the Harris Tweed Forum stated 2012 had been the best year for production in 15 years.

HUDDERSFIELD FABRICS IN UK

There are a number of towns in the UK known for their textiles reputation but very few have had as much regard as the town of  Huddersfield. Huddersfield has had a massive heritage for fabrics  including tweed and it has also has always had a history for all other  types of stunning textiles. Over the past 700 years Huddersfield has been  at the heart of fabric production in the UK. The history of Huddersfield  being at the heart of textile manufacturing is huge. With the decline of fabric production it has made the establishments that still stand and the UK brands that are accessed by fabric agents exceptionally special. There  are a number of reasons why the area proved consistently popular as a  hub for textile development and production. There were unique geological and environmental factors that made Huddersfield the  perfect area for creating stunning wool textiles. The main reason was  the convergence of two rivers, the river Colne and Holme was a unique  area of water that filtered slowly through the Pennines rocks.

ukf

TEXTILE AND FABRICS

The rivers  winding their way through the hills went on to provide the perfect  environment for sheep to wander, to graze and to flourish. It also made  perfect conditions for washing and making great raw wool. It started as a cottage industry with people spinning and weaving wool cloth in their own homes. They sold through Merchants at the local cloth hall. When  the Industrial Revolution took place the cottage weavers could not  compete anymore and so they took their skills into the Mills. Over the  years certain UK countries became synonymous with fabric and textiles and Huddersfield became one of them. ‘Made in Huddersfield’ became a  massively famous symbol and Huddersfield produced fabric became  much sort after worldwide. The town flourished with its fame and if you  look at the town today the architecture of the old buildings shows the  money invested in this town by the industrialists at that time. There  were so many traditional craftsmen in this area at the time. From  spinners, designers, weavers, menders and so many more types of tradespeople. Sadly over the years some of the mills have gone but a  strong history and heritage still surrounds fabrics in Huddersfield today.